Adios NC. 
#plane #airport #vscocam

Adios NC.
#plane #airport #vscocam

An interesting week. @everydayusa #everdayeveeywhere #everydayusa #documentary #photojournalism #photography

An interesting week. @everydayusa #everdayeveeywhere #everydayusa #documentary #photojournalism #photography

Out of the window of the sub par hotel room, even the interstate can feel lonely

Out of the window of the sub par hotel room, even the interstate can feel lonely

"SPARTAN" the communications  officer for the Arizona Border Recon records the coordinates of Foxtrot team, less than a mile away. The AZBR is a militia style group who voluntarily patrols the Arizona Mexico border east of Sasabe.

"SPARTAN" the communications officer for the Arizona Border Recon records the coordinates of Foxtrot team, less than a mile away. The AZBR is a militia style group who voluntarily patrols the Arizona Mexico border east of Sasabe.

The fence that separates the Sonora Nogales (MEX) from Nogales (USA), as seen from the US.  (at Nogalez Az.)

The fence that separates the Sonora Nogales (MEX) from Nogales (USA), as seen from the US. (at Nogalez Az.)

A different kind of ‘Rat Pack’

crosscrowdedrooms:

CNN just ran a gallery about my ongoing project on the urban evolution of rats in NYC.  Check it out, have a look!  More to come in the future.  Thanks!

A different kind of ‘Rat Pack’

CNN just ran a gallery about my ongoing project on the urban evolution of rats in NYC.  Check it out, have a look!  More to come in the future.  Thanks!

Lake George, NY

Lake George, NY

Lake George, NY

Lake George, NY

Lake George, NY

Lake George, NY

Lake George, NY

Lake George, NY

Lake George, NY

Lake George, NY

Lake George, NY

Today I photographed the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge from the bucket of a fire truck.  Hundreds of participants came out and helped form the letters ICE ALS as their participation in the ALS Bucket Challenge.  

Today I photographed the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge from the bucket of a fire truck.  Hundreds of participants came out and helped form the letters ICE ALS as their participation in the ALS Bucket Challenge.  

Today I photographed the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge from the bucket of a fire truck.  Hundreds of participants came out and helped form the letters ICE ALS as their participation in the ALS Bucket Challenge.  

Today I photographed the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge from the bucket of a fire truck.  Hundreds of participants came out and helped form the letters ICE ALS as their participation in the ALS Bucket Challenge.  

Today I photographed the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge from the bucket of a fire truck.  Hundreds of participants came out and helped form the letters ICE ALS as their participation in the ALS Bucket Challenge.  

Today I photographed the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge from the bucket of a fire truck.  Hundreds of participants came out and helped form the letters ICE ALS as their participation in the ALS Bucket Challenge.  

Today I photographed the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge from the bucket of a fire truck.  Hundreds of participants came out and helped form the letters ICE ALS as their participation in the ALS Bucket Challenge.  

A huge ALS bucket challenge. People spelling out ICE-ALS.

A huge ALS bucket challenge. People spelling out ICE-ALS.

About an hour east of New York City, just out of earshot of Interstate 495 and minutes away from Long Island’s MacArthur Airport, you can find a taste of the Midwest.   Tucked away inside the mere 7 square mile hamlet of Holtsville, a horse trainer just met his next venture.  For the past three months I’ve been photographing a horse trainer here on Long Island.  Cliff Schadt acquired a feral Mustang horse from the barren lands of the California desert.  In an attempt to seemingly help alleviate a nearing capacity of horse population, the Bureau of Land Management, working with various organizations, is encouraging Mustang adoption through competition.  Trainers are given approximately 90 days to train a once feral mustang under BLM control.  At the culmination of those 90 days, Cliff will demonstrate the progress of the horse and the horse’s learned gentleness, amiability, and level of compatibility in the hopes that a sponsor or guest at the competition will eventually adopt him.  The horse is temporarily named Lost Cowboy, after the clothing brand that is owned by Cliff’s sponsors during the challenge.

About an hour east of New York City, just out of earshot of Interstate 495 and minutes away from Long Island’s MacArthur Airport, you can find a taste of the Midwest.   Tucked away inside the mere 7 square mile hamlet of Holtsville, a horse trainer just met his next venture.  For the past three months I’ve been photographing a horse trainer here on Long Island.  Cliff Schadt acquired a feral Mustang horse from the barren lands of the California desert.  In an attempt to seemingly help alleviate a nearing capacity of horse population, the Bureau of Land Management, working with various organizations, is encouraging Mustang adoption through competition.  Trainers are given approximately 90 days to train a once feral mustang under BLM control.  At the culmination of those 90 days, Cliff will demonstrate the progress of the horse and the horse’s learned gentleness, amiability, and level of compatibility in the hopes that a sponsor or guest at the competition will eventually adopt him.  The horse is temporarily named Lost Cowboy, after the clothing brand that is owned by Cliff’s sponsors during the challenge.

About an hour east of New York City, just out of earshot of Interstate 495 and minutes away from Long Island’s MacArthur Airport, you can find a taste of the Midwest.   Tucked away inside the mere 7 square mile hamlet of Holtsville, a horse trainer just met his next venture.  For the past three months I’ve been photographing a horse trainer here on Long Island.  Cliff Schadt acquired a feral Mustang horse from the barren lands of the California desert.  In an attempt to seemingly help alleviate a nearing capacity of horse population, the Bureau of Land Management, working with various organizations, is encouraging Mustang adoption through competition.  Trainers are given approximately 90 days to train a once feral mustang under BLM control.  At the culmination of those 90 days, Cliff will demonstrate the progress of the horse and the horse’s learned gentleness, amiability, and level of compatibility in the hopes that a sponsor or guest at the competition will eventually adopt him.  The horse is temporarily named Lost Cowboy, after the clothing brand that is owned by Cliff’s sponsors during the challenge.

About an hour east of New York City, just out of earshot of Interstate 495 and minutes away from Long Island’s MacArthur Airport, you can find a taste of the Midwest.   Tucked away inside the mere 7 square mile hamlet of Holtsville, a horse trainer just met his next venture.  For the past three months I’ve been photographing a horse trainer here on Long Island.  Cliff Schadt acquired a feral Mustang horse from the barren lands of the California desert.  In an attempt to seemingly help alleviate a nearing capacity of horse population, the Bureau of Land Management, working with various organizations, is encouraging Mustang adoption through competition.  Trainers are given approximately 90 days to train a once feral mustang under BLM control.  At the culmination of those 90 days, Cliff will demonstrate the progress of the horse and the horse’s learned gentleness, amiability, and level of compatibility in the hopes that a sponsor or guest at the competition will eventually adopt him.  The horse is temporarily named Lost Cowboy, after the clothing brand that is owned by Cliff’s sponsors during the challenge.

About an hour east of New York City, just out of earshot of Interstate 495 and minutes away from Long Island’s MacArthur Airport, you can find a taste of the Midwest.   Tucked away inside the mere 7 square mile hamlet of Holtsville, a horse trainer just met his next venture.  For the past three months I’ve been photographing a horse trainer here on Long Island.  Cliff Schadt acquired a feral Mustang horse from the barren lands of the California desert.  In an attempt to seemingly help alleviate a nearing capacity of horse population, the Bureau of Land Management, working with various organizations, is encouraging Mustang adoption through competition.  Trainers are given approximately 90 days to train a once feral mustang under BLM control.  At the culmination of those 90 days, Cliff will demonstrate the progress of the horse and the horse’s learned gentleness, amiability, and level of compatibility in the hopes that a sponsor or guest at the competition will eventually adopt him.  The horse is temporarily named Lost Cowboy, after the clothing brand that is owned by Cliff’s sponsors during the challenge.

About an hour east of New York City, just out of earshot of Interstate 495 and minutes away from Long Island’s MacArthur Airport, you can find a taste of the Midwest.   Tucked away inside the mere 7 square mile hamlet of Holtsville, a horse trainer just met his next venture.  For the past three months I’ve been photographing a horse trainer here on Long Island.  Cliff Schadt acquired a feral Mustang horse from the barren lands of the California desert.  In an attempt to seemingly help alleviate a nearing capacity of horse population, the Bureau of Land Management, working with various organizations, is encouraging Mustang adoption through competition.  Trainers are given approximately 90 days to train a once feral mustang under BLM control.  At the culmination of those 90 days, Cliff will demonstrate the progress of the horse and the horse’s learned gentleness, amiability, and level of compatibility in the hopes that a sponsor or guest at the competition will eventually adopt him.  The horse is temporarily named Lost Cowboy, after the clothing brand that is owned by Cliff’s sponsors during the challenge.

About an hour east of New York City, just out of earshot of Interstate 495 and minutes away from Long Island’s MacArthur Airport, you can find a taste of the Midwest.   Tucked away inside the mere 7 square mile hamlet of Holtsville, a horse trainer just met his next venture.  For the past three months I’ve been photographing a horse trainer here on Long Island.  Cliff Schadt acquired a feral Mustang horse from the barren lands of the California desert.  In an attempt to seemingly help alleviate a nearing capacity of horse population, the Bureau of Land Management, working with various organizations, is encouraging Mustang adoption through competition.  Trainers are given approximately 90 days to train a once feral mustang under BLM control.  At the culmination of those 90 days, Cliff will demonstrate the progress of the horse and the horse’s learned gentleness, amiability, and level of compatibility in the hopes that a sponsor or guest at the competition will eventually adopt him.  The horse is temporarily named Lost Cowboy, after the clothing brand that is owned by Cliff’s sponsors during the challenge.

About an hour east of New York City, just out of earshot of Interstate 495 and minutes away from Long Island’s MacArthur Airport, you can find a taste of the Midwest.   Tucked away inside the mere 7 square mile hamlet of Holtsville, a horse trainer just met his next venture.  For the past three months I’ve been photographing a horse trainer here on Long Island.  Cliff Schadt acquired a feral Mustang horse from the barren lands of the California desert.  In an attempt to seemingly help alleviate a nearing capacity of horse population, the Bureau of Land Management, working with various organizations, is encouraging Mustang adoption through competition.  Trainers are given approximately 90 days to train a once feral mustang under BLM control.  At the culmination of those 90 days, Cliff will demonstrate the progress of the horse and the horse’s learned gentleness, amiability, and level of compatibility in the hopes that a sponsor or guest at the competition will eventually adopt him.  The horse is temporarily named Lost Cowboy, after the clothing brand that is owned by Cliff’s sponsors during the challenge.

About an hour east of New York City, just out of earshot of Interstate 495 and minutes away from Long Island’s MacArthur Airport, you can find a taste of the Midwest.   Tucked away inside the mere 7 square mile hamlet of Holtsville, a horse trainer just met his next venture.  For the past three months I’ve been photographing a horse trainer here on Long Island.  Cliff Schadt acquired a feral Mustang horse from the barren lands of the California desert.  In an attempt to seemingly help alleviate a nearing capacity of horse population, the Bureau of Land Management, working with various organizations, is encouraging Mustang adoption through competition.  Trainers are given approximately 90 days to train a once feral mustang under BLM control.  At the culmination of those 90 days, Cliff will demonstrate the progress of the horse and the horse’s learned gentleness, amiability, and level of compatibility in the hopes that a sponsor or guest at the competition will eventually adopt him.  The horse is temporarily named Lost Cowboy, after the clothing brand that is owned by Cliff’s sponsors during the challenge.

About an hour east of New York City, just out of earshot of Interstate 495 and minutes away from Long Island’s MacArthur Airport, you can find a taste of the Midwest.   Tucked away inside the mere 7 square mile hamlet of Holtsville, a horse trainer just met his next venture.  For the past three months I’ve been photographing a horse trainer here on Long Island.  Cliff Schadt acquired a feral Mustang horse from the barren lands of the California desert.  In an attempt to seemingly help alleviate a nearing capacity of horse population, the Bureau of Land Management, working with various organizations, is encouraging Mustang adoption through competition.  Trainers are given approximately 90 days to train a once feral mustang under BLM control.  At the culmination of those 90 days, Cliff will demonstrate the progress of the horse and the horse’s learned gentleness, amiability, and level of compatibility in the hopes that a sponsor or guest at the competition will eventually adopt him.  The horse is temporarily named Lost Cowboy, after the clothing brand that is owned by Cliff’s sponsors during the challenge.

About an hour east of New York City, just out of earshot of Interstate 495 and minutes away from Long Island’s MacArthur Airport, you can find a taste of the Midwest.   Tucked away inside the mere 7 square mile hamlet of Holtsville, a horse trainer just met his next venture.  For the past three months I’ve been photographing a horse trainer here on Long Island.  Cliff Schadt acquired a feral Mustang horse from the barren lands of the California desert.  In an attempt to seemingly help alleviate a nearing capacity of horse population, the Bureau of Land Management, working with various organizations, is encouraging Mustang adoption through competition.  Trainers are given approximately 90 days to train a once feral mustang under BLM control.  At the culmination of those 90 days, Cliff will demonstrate the progress of the horse and the horse’s learned gentleness, amiability, and level of compatibility in the hopes that a sponsor or guest at the competition will eventually adopt him.  The horse is temporarily named Lost Cowboy, after the clothing brand that is owned by Cliff’s sponsors during the challenge.