A different kind of ‘Rat Pack’

crosscrowdedrooms:

CNN just ran a gallery about my ongoing project on the urban evolution of rats in NYC.  Check it out, have a look!  More to come in the future.  Thanks!

A different kind of ‘Rat Pack’

CNN just ran a gallery about my ongoing project on the urban evolution of rats in NYC.  Check it out, have a look!  More to come in the future.  Thanks!

Lake George, NY

Lake George, NY

Lake George, NY

Lake George, NY

Lake George, NY

Lake George, NY

Lake George, NY

Lake George, NY

Lake George, NY

Lake George, NY

Lake George, NY

Today I photographed the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge from the bucket of a fire truck.  Hundreds of participants came out and helped form the letters ICE ALS as their participation in the ALS Bucket Challenge.  

Today I photographed the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge from the bucket of a fire truck.  Hundreds of participants came out and helped form the letters ICE ALS as their participation in the ALS Bucket Challenge.  

Today I photographed the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge from the bucket of a fire truck.  Hundreds of participants came out and helped form the letters ICE ALS as their participation in the ALS Bucket Challenge.  

Today I photographed the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge from the bucket of a fire truck.  Hundreds of participants came out and helped form the letters ICE ALS as their participation in the ALS Bucket Challenge.  

Today I photographed the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge from the bucket of a fire truck.  Hundreds of participants came out and helped form the letters ICE ALS as their participation in the ALS Bucket Challenge.  

Today I photographed the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge from the bucket of a fire truck.  Hundreds of participants came out and helped form the letters ICE ALS as their participation in the ALS Bucket Challenge.  

Today I photographed the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge from the bucket of a fire truck.  Hundreds of participants came out and helped form the letters ICE ALS as their participation in the ALS Bucket Challenge.  

A huge ALS bucket challenge. People spelling out ICE-ALS.

A huge ALS bucket challenge. People spelling out ICE-ALS.

About an hour east of New York City, just out of earshot of Interstate 495 and minutes away from Long Island’s MacArthur Airport, you can find a taste of the Midwest.   Tucked away inside the mere 7 square mile hamlet of Holtsville, a horse trainer just met his next venture.  For the past three months I’ve been photographing a horse trainer here on Long Island.  Cliff Schadt acquired a feral Mustang horse from the barren lands of the California desert.  In an attempt to seemingly help alleviate a nearing capacity of horse population, the Bureau of Land Management, working with various organizations, is encouraging Mustang adoption through competition.  Trainers are given approximately 90 days to train a once feral mustang under BLM control.  At the culmination of those 90 days, Cliff will demonstrate the progress of the horse and the horse’s learned gentleness, amiability, and level of compatibility in the hopes that a sponsor or guest at the competition will eventually adopt him.  The horse is temporarily named Lost Cowboy, after the clothing brand that is owned by Cliff’s sponsors during the challenge.

About an hour east of New York City, just out of earshot of Interstate 495 and minutes away from Long Island’s MacArthur Airport, you can find a taste of the Midwest.   Tucked away inside the mere 7 square mile hamlet of Holtsville, a horse trainer just met his next venture.  For the past three months I’ve been photographing a horse trainer here on Long Island.  Cliff Schadt acquired a feral Mustang horse from the barren lands of the California desert.  In an attempt to seemingly help alleviate a nearing capacity of horse population, the Bureau of Land Management, working with various organizations, is encouraging Mustang adoption through competition.  Trainers are given approximately 90 days to train a once feral mustang under BLM control.  At the culmination of those 90 days, Cliff will demonstrate the progress of the horse and the horse’s learned gentleness, amiability, and level of compatibility in the hopes that a sponsor or guest at the competition will eventually adopt him.  The horse is temporarily named Lost Cowboy, after the clothing brand that is owned by Cliff’s sponsors during the challenge.

About an hour east of New York City, just out of earshot of Interstate 495 and minutes away from Long Island’s MacArthur Airport, you can find a taste of the Midwest.   Tucked away inside the mere 7 square mile hamlet of Holtsville, a horse trainer just met his next venture.  For the past three months I’ve been photographing a horse trainer here on Long Island.  Cliff Schadt acquired a feral Mustang horse from the barren lands of the California desert.  In an attempt to seemingly help alleviate a nearing capacity of horse population, the Bureau of Land Management, working with various organizations, is encouraging Mustang adoption through competition.  Trainers are given approximately 90 days to train a once feral mustang under BLM control.  At the culmination of those 90 days, Cliff will demonstrate the progress of the horse and the horse’s learned gentleness, amiability, and level of compatibility in the hopes that a sponsor or guest at the competition will eventually adopt him.  The horse is temporarily named Lost Cowboy, after the clothing brand that is owned by Cliff’s sponsors during the challenge.

About an hour east of New York City, just out of earshot of Interstate 495 and minutes away from Long Island’s MacArthur Airport, you can find a taste of the Midwest.   Tucked away inside the mere 7 square mile hamlet of Holtsville, a horse trainer just met his next venture.  For the past three months I’ve been photographing a horse trainer here on Long Island.  Cliff Schadt acquired a feral Mustang horse from the barren lands of the California desert.  In an attempt to seemingly help alleviate a nearing capacity of horse population, the Bureau of Land Management, working with various organizations, is encouraging Mustang adoption through competition.  Trainers are given approximately 90 days to train a once feral mustang under BLM control.  At the culmination of those 90 days, Cliff will demonstrate the progress of the horse and the horse’s learned gentleness, amiability, and level of compatibility in the hopes that a sponsor or guest at the competition will eventually adopt him.  The horse is temporarily named Lost Cowboy, after the clothing brand that is owned by Cliff’s sponsors during the challenge.

About an hour east of New York City, just out of earshot of Interstate 495 and minutes away from Long Island’s MacArthur Airport, you can find a taste of the Midwest.   Tucked away inside the mere 7 square mile hamlet of Holtsville, a horse trainer just met his next venture.  For the past three months I’ve been photographing a horse trainer here on Long Island.  Cliff Schadt acquired a feral Mustang horse from the barren lands of the California desert.  In an attempt to seemingly help alleviate a nearing capacity of horse population, the Bureau of Land Management, working with various organizations, is encouraging Mustang adoption through competition.  Trainers are given approximately 90 days to train a once feral mustang under BLM control.  At the culmination of those 90 days, Cliff will demonstrate the progress of the horse and the horse’s learned gentleness, amiability, and level of compatibility in the hopes that a sponsor or guest at the competition will eventually adopt him.  The horse is temporarily named Lost Cowboy, after the clothing brand that is owned by Cliff’s sponsors during the challenge.

About an hour east of New York City, just out of earshot of Interstate 495 and minutes away from Long Island’s MacArthur Airport, you can find a taste of the Midwest.   Tucked away inside the mere 7 square mile hamlet of Holtsville, a horse trainer just met his next venture.  For the past three months I’ve been photographing a horse trainer here on Long Island.  Cliff Schadt acquired a feral Mustang horse from the barren lands of the California desert.  In an attempt to seemingly help alleviate a nearing capacity of horse population, the Bureau of Land Management, working with various organizations, is encouraging Mustang adoption through competition.  Trainers are given approximately 90 days to train a once feral mustang under BLM control.  At the culmination of those 90 days, Cliff will demonstrate the progress of the horse and the horse’s learned gentleness, amiability, and level of compatibility in the hopes that a sponsor or guest at the competition will eventually adopt him.  The horse is temporarily named Lost Cowboy, after the clothing brand that is owned by Cliff’s sponsors during the challenge.

About an hour east of New York City, just out of earshot of Interstate 495 and minutes away from Long Island’s MacArthur Airport, you can find a taste of the Midwest.   Tucked away inside the mere 7 square mile hamlet of Holtsville, a horse trainer just met his next venture.  For the past three months I’ve been photographing a horse trainer here on Long Island.  Cliff Schadt acquired a feral Mustang horse from the barren lands of the California desert.  In an attempt to seemingly help alleviate a nearing capacity of horse population, the Bureau of Land Management, working with various organizations, is encouraging Mustang adoption through competition.  Trainers are given approximately 90 days to train a once feral mustang under BLM control.  At the culmination of those 90 days, Cliff will demonstrate the progress of the horse and the horse’s learned gentleness, amiability, and level of compatibility in the hopes that a sponsor or guest at the competition will eventually adopt him.  The horse is temporarily named Lost Cowboy, after the clothing brand that is owned by Cliff’s sponsors during the challenge.

About an hour east of New York City, just out of earshot of Interstate 495 and minutes away from Long Island’s MacArthur Airport, you can find a taste of the Midwest.   Tucked away inside the mere 7 square mile hamlet of Holtsville, a horse trainer just met his next venture.  For the past three months I’ve been photographing a horse trainer here on Long Island.  Cliff Schadt acquired a feral Mustang horse from the barren lands of the California desert.  In an attempt to seemingly help alleviate a nearing capacity of horse population, the Bureau of Land Management, working with various organizations, is encouraging Mustang adoption through competition.  Trainers are given approximately 90 days to train a once feral mustang under BLM control.  At the culmination of those 90 days, Cliff will demonstrate the progress of the horse and the horse’s learned gentleness, amiability, and level of compatibility in the hopes that a sponsor or guest at the competition will eventually adopt him.  The horse is temporarily named Lost Cowboy, after the clothing brand that is owned by Cliff’s sponsors during the challenge.

About an hour east of New York City, just out of earshot of Interstate 495 and minutes away from Long Island’s MacArthur Airport, you can find a taste of the Midwest.   Tucked away inside the mere 7 square mile hamlet of Holtsville, a horse trainer just met his next venture.  For the past three months I’ve been photographing a horse trainer here on Long Island.  Cliff Schadt acquired a feral Mustang horse from the barren lands of the California desert.  In an attempt to seemingly help alleviate a nearing capacity of horse population, the Bureau of Land Management, working with various organizations, is encouraging Mustang adoption through competition.  Trainers are given approximately 90 days to train a once feral mustang under BLM control.  At the culmination of those 90 days, Cliff will demonstrate the progress of the horse and the horse’s learned gentleness, amiability, and level of compatibility in the hopes that a sponsor or guest at the competition will eventually adopt him.  The horse is temporarily named Lost Cowboy, after the clothing brand that is owned by Cliff’s sponsors during the challenge.

About an hour east of New York City, just out of earshot of Interstate 495 and minutes away from Long Island’s MacArthur Airport, you can find a taste of the Midwest.   Tucked away inside the mere 7 square mile hamlet of Holtsville, a horse trainer just met his next venture.  For the past three months I’ve been photographing a horse trainer here on Long Island.  Cliff Schadt acquired a feral Mustang horse from the barren lands of the California desert.  In an attempt to seemingly help alleviate a nearing capacity of horse population, the Bureau of Land Management, working with various organizations, is encouraging Mustang adoption through competition.  Trainers are given approximately 90 days to train a once feral mustang under BLM control.  At the culmination of those 90 days, Cliff will demonstrate the progress of the horse and the horse’s learned gentleness, amiability, and level of compatibility in the hopes that a sponsor or guest at the competition will eventually adopt him.  The horse is temporarily named Lost Cowboy, after the clothing brand that is owned by Cliff’s sponsors during the challenge.

About an hour east of New York City, just out of earshot of Interstate 495 and minutes away from Long Island’s MacArthur Airport, you can find a taste of the Midwest.   Tucked away inside the mere 7 square mile hamlet of Holtsville, a horse trainer just met his next venture.  For the past three months I’ve been photographing a horse trainer here on Long Island.  Cliff Schadt acquired a feral Mustang horse from the barren lands of the California desert.  In an attempt to seemingly help alleviate a nearing capacity of horse population, the Bureau of Land Management, working with various organizations, is encouraging Mustang adoption through competition.  Trainers are given approximately 90 days to train a once feral mustang under BLM control.  At the culmination of those 90 days, Cliff will demonstrate the progress of the horse and the horse’s learned gentleness, amiability, and level of compatibility in the hopes that a sponsor or guest at the competition will eventually adopt him.  The horse is temporarily named Lost Cowboy, after the clothing brand that is owned by Cliff’s sponsors during the challenge.

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I shot two vapor shops on Long Island.  The hobby is turning quite popular, with shops, bars, and lounges popping up all over.  Increases in regulation include raising the minimum age to 21 come 2015, as well as more stringent labeling on flavor bottles and modification devices.  

I shot two vapor shops on Long Island.  The hobby is turning quite popular, with shops, bars, and lounges popping up all over.  Increases in regulation include raising the minimum age to 21 come 2015, as well as more stringent labeling on flavor bottles and modification devices.  

I shot two vapor shops on Long Island.  The hobby is turning quite popular, with shops, bars, and lounges popping up all over.  Increases in regulation include raising the minimum age to 21 come 2015, as well as more stringent labeling on flavor bottles and modification devices.  

I shot two vapor shops on Long Island.  The hobby is turning quite popular, with shops, bars, and lounges popping up all over.  Increases in regulation include raising the minimum age to 21 come 2015, as well as more stringent labeling on flavor bottles and modification devices.  

I shot two vapor shops on Long Island.  The hobby is turning quite popular, with shops, bars, and lounges popping up all over.  Increases in regulation include raising the minimum age to 21 come 2015, as well as more stringent labeling on flavor bottles and modification devices.  

I shot two vapor shops on Long Island.  The hobby is turning quite popular, with shops, bars, and lounges popping up all over.  Increases in regulation include raising the minimum age to 21 come 2015, as well as more stringent labeling on flavor bottles and modification devices.  

I shot two vapor shops on Long Island.  The hobby is turning quite popular, with shops, bars, and lounges popping up all over.  Increases in regulation include raising the minimum age to 21 come 2015, as well as more stringent labeling on flavor bottles and modification devices.  

I shot two vapor shops on Long Island.  The hobby is turning quite popular, with shops, bars, and lounges popping up all over.  Increases in regulation include raising the minimum age to 21 come 2015, as well as more stringent labeling on flavor bottles and modification devices.  

I shot two vapor shops on Long Island.  The hobby is turning quite popular, with shops, bars, and lounges popping up all over.  Increases in regulation include raising the minimum age to 21 come 2015, as well as more stringent labeling on flavor bottles and modification devices.  

Gubernatorial candidate Rob Astorino looks to expand his constituency on Long Island (and to also take advantage of the Cuomo corruption investigation)

Gubernatorial candidate Rob Astorino looks to expand his constituency on Long Island (and to also take advantage of the Cuomo corruption investigation)

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I’ve been incorporating a new concept into my website where I swap out the homepage image every week with an image taken within those 7 days.  This weeks image is of an essay I’ve been working on about a Long Island horse trainer who has acquired a feral Mustang and has 90 days to train the horse in the Extreme Mustang Makeover challenge.

I had visited Death Valley once before in 2011 (?) but my time there was cut short to a day because I hadn’t realized that my flight home was to depart a few hours after me and a friend had arrived there from LA.  Typical me.  Trekking back out there for a few days had always been on my radar, so it was exhilarating to head back there this year.  Although I had briefly visited some of the hot spots on my previous day trip, they were even more astonishing the second time around, as was the temperature, which hit 115°-125° depending on which thermometer you read (weather app vs car).    Watching the sun set, and the moon rise from above the lowest elevation in North America was nothing short of surreal.  A popular tourist spot, everyone had all but left by the time the sun was dashing behind the mountains, leaving me and my girlfriend standing on top of rock formations watching as stars, planets, and everything in between awoke.  
In a region that has 3 hotels, and something like 3-4 gas stations in over 5,000sqmi of arid, dry, and unforgiving terrain you couldn’t help but think that there was one stretch of land there that has yet seen a human footprint, which was a humbling thought to say the least, particularly when reminding yourself that you’re still in the US.  
With enough time camping in the desert, walking across sand dunes feeling like you’re a part in Lawrence of Arabia, licking pure salt deposits, walking through “ghost towns”, and hiking through rock formations, you’ll surely begin questioning what planet you’re on, exactly.
If you’ve ever wondered the significance of the human race in the universe, you’d need not go anywhere but here to realize that, well, it’s not much. 

I had visited Death Valley once before in 2011 (?) but my time there was cut short to a day because I hadn’t realized that my flight home was to depart a few hours after me and a friend had arrived there from LA.  Typical me.  Trekking back out there for a few days had always been on my radar, so it was exhilarating to head back there this year.  Although I had briefly visited some of the hot spots on my previous day trip, they were even more astonishing the second time around, as was the temperature, which hit 115°-125° depending on which thermometer you read (weather app vs car).    Watching the sun set, and the moon rise from above the lowest elevation in North America was nothing short of surreal.  A popular tourist spot, everyone had all but left by the time the sun was dashing behind the mountains, leaving me and my girlfriend standing on top of rock formations watching as stars, planets, and everything in between awoke.  
In a region that has 3 hotels, and something like 3-4 gas stations in over 5,000sqmi of arid, dry, and unforgiving terrain you couldn’t help but think that there was one stretch of land there that has yet seen a human footprint, which was a humbling thought to say the least, particularly when reminding yourself that you’re still in the US.  
With enough time camping in the desert, walking across sand dunes feeling like you’re a part in Lawrence of Arabia, licking pure salt deposits, walking through “ghost towns”, and hiking through rock formations, you’ll surely begin questioning what planet you’re on, exactly.
If you’ve ever wondered the significance of the human race in the universe, you’d need not go anywhere but here to realize that, well, it’s not much. 

I had visited Death Valley once before in 2011 (?) but my time there was cut short to a day because I hadn’t realized that my flight home was to depart a few hours after me and a friend had arrived there from LA.  Typical me.  Trekking back out there for a few days had always been on my radar, so it was exhilarating to head back there this year.  Although I had briefly visited some of the hot spots on my previous day trip, they were even more astonishing the second time around, as was the temperature, which hit 115°-125° depending on which thermometer you read (weather app vs car).    Watching the sun set, and the moon rise from above the lowest elevation in North America was nothing short of surreal.  A popular tourist spot, everyone had all but left by the time the sun was dashing behind the mountains, leaving me and my girlfriend standing on top of rock formations watching as stars, planets, and everything in between awoke.  
In a region that has 3 hotels, and something like 3-4 gas stations in over 5,000sqmi of arid, dry, and unforgiving terrain you couldn’t help but think that there was one stretch of land there that has yet seen a human footprint, which was a humbling thought to say the least, particularly when reminding yourself that you’re still in the US.  
With enough time camping in the desert, walking across sand dunes feeling like you’re a part in Lawrence of Arabia, licking pure salt deposits, walking through “ghost towns”, and hiking through rock formations, you’ll surely begin questioning what planet you’re on, exactly.
If you’ve ever wondered the significance of the human race in the universe, you’d need not go anywhere but here to realize that, well, it’s not much. 

I had visited Death Valley once before in 2011 (?) but my time there was cut short to a day because I hadn’t realized that my flight home was to depart a few hours after me and a friend had arrived there from LA.  Typical me.  Trekking back out there for a few days had always been on my radar, so it was exhilarating to head back there this year.  Although I had briefly visited some of the hot spots on my previous day trip, they were even more astonishing the second time around, as was the temperature, which hit 115°-125° depending on which thermometer you read (weather app vs car).    Watching the sun set, and the moon rise from above the lowest elevation in North America was nothing short of surreal.  A popular tourist spot, everyone had all but left by the time the sun was dashing behind the mountains, leaving me and my girlfriend standing on top of rock formations watching as stars, planets, and everything in between awoke.  
In a region that has 3 hotels, and something like 3-4 gas stations in over 5,000sqmi of arid, dry, and unforgiving terrain you couldn’t help but think that there was one stretch of land there that has yet seen a human footprint, which was a humbling thought to say the least, particularly when reminding yourself that you’re still in the US.  
With enough time camping in the desert, walking across sand dunes feeling like you’re a part in Lawrence of Arabia, licking pure salt deposits, walking through “ghost towns”, and hiking through rock formations, you’ll surely begin questioning what planet you’re on, exactly.
If you’ve ever wondered the significance of the human race in the universe, you’d need not go anywhere but here to realize that, well, it’s not much. 

I had visited Death Valley once before in 2011 (?) but my time there was cut short to a day because I hadn’t realized that my flight home was to depart a few hours after me and a friend had arrived there from LA.  Typical me.  Trekking back out there for a few days had always been on my radar, so it was exhilarating to head back there this year.  Although I had briefly visited some of the hot spots on my previous day trip, they were even more astonishing the second time around, as was the temperature, which hit 115°-125° depending on which thermometer you read (weather app vs car).    Watching the sun set, and the moon rise from above the lowest elevation in North America was nothing short of surreal.  A popular tourist spot, everyone had all but left by the time the sun was dashing behind the mountains, leaving me and my girlfriend standing on top of rock formations watching as stars, planets, and everything in between awoke.  
In a region that has 3 hotels, and something like 3-4 gas stations in over 5,000sqmi of arid, dry, and unforgiving terrain you couldn’t help but think that there was one stretch of land there that has yet seen a human footprint, which was a humbling thought to say the least, particularly when reminding yourself that you’re still in the US.  
With enough time camping in the desert, walking across sand dunes feeling like you’re a part in Lawrence of Arabia, licking pure salt deposits, walking through “ghost towns”, and hiking through rock formations, you’ll surely begin questioning what planet you’re on, exactly.
If you’ve ever wondered the significance of the human race in the universe, you’d need not go anywhere but here to realize that, well, it’s not much. 

I had visited Death Valley once before in 2011 (?) but my time there was cut short to a day because I hadn’t realized that my flight home was to depart a few hours after me and a friend had arrived there from LA.  Typical me.  Trekking back out there for a few days had always been on my radar, so it was exhilarating to head back there this year.  Although I had briefly visited some of the hot spots on my previous day trip, they were even more astonishing the second time around, as was the temperature, which hit 115°-125° depending on which thermometer you read (weather app vs car).    Watching the sun set, and the moon rise from above the lowest elevation in North America was nothing short of surreal.  A popular tourist spot, everyone had all but left by the time the sun was dashing behind the mountains, leaving me and my girlfriend standing on top of rock formations watching as stars, planets, and everything in between awoke.  
In a region that has 3 hotels, and something like 3-4 gas stations in over 5,000sqmi of arid, dry, and unforgiving terrain you couldn’t help but think that there was one stretch of land there that has yet seen a human footprint, which was a humbling thought to say the least, particularly when reminding yourself that you’re still in the US.  
With enough time camping in the desert, walking across sand dunes feeling like you’re a part in Lawrence of Arabia, licking pure salt deposits, walking through “ghost towns”, and hiking through rock formations, you’ll surely begin questioning what planet you’re on, exactly.
If you’ve ever wondered the significance of the human race in the universe, you’d need not go anywhere but here to realize that, well, it’s not much. 

I had visited Death Valley once before in 2011 (?) but my time there was cut short to a day because I hadn’t realized that my flight home was to depart a few hours after me and a friend had arrived there from LA.  Typical me.  Trekking back out there for a few days had always been on my radar, so it was exhilarating to head back there this year.  Although I had briefly visited some of the hot spots on my previous day trip, they were even more astonishing the second time around, as was the temperature, which hit 115°-125° depending on which thermometer you read (weather app vs car).    Watching the sun set, and the moon rise from above the lowest elevation in North America was nothing short of surreal.  A popular tourist spot, everyone had all but left by the time the sun was dashing behind the mountains, leaving me and my girlfriend standing on top of rock formations watching as stars, planets, and everything in between awoke.  
In a region that has 3 hotels, and something like 3-4 gas stations in over 5,000sqmi of arid, dry, and unforgiving terrain you couldn’t help but think that there was one stretch of land there that has yet seen a human footprint, which was a humbling thought to say the least, particularly when reminding yourself that you’re still in the US.  
With enough time camping in the desert, walking across sand dunes feeling like you’re a part in Lawrence of Arabia, licking pure salt deposits, walking through “ghost towns”, and hiking through rock formations, you’ll surely begin questioning what planet you’re on, exactly.
If you’ve ever wondered the significance of the human race in the universe, you’d need not go anywhere but here to realize that, well, it’s not much. 

I had visited Death Valley once before in 2011 (?) but my time there was cut short to a day because I hadn’t realized that my flight home was to depart a few hours after me and a friend had arrived there from LA.  Typical me.  Trekking back out there for a few days had always been on my radar, so it was exhilarating to head back there this year.  Although I had briefly visited some of the hot spots on my previous day trip, they were even more astonishing the second time around, as was the temperature, which hit 115°-125° depending on which thermometer you read (weather app vs car).    Watching the sun set, and the moon rise from above the lowest elevation in North America was nothing short of surreal.  A popular tourist spot, everyone had all but left by the time the sun was dashing behind the mountains, leaving me and my girlfriend standing on top of rock formations watching as stars, planets, and everything in between awoke.  

In a region that has 3 hotels, and something like 3-4 gas stations in over 5,000sqmi of arid, dry, and unforgiving terrain you couldn’t help but think that there was one stretch of land there that has yet seen a human footprint, which was a humbling thought to say the least, particularly when reminding yourself that you’re still in the US.  

With enough time camping in the desert, walking across sand dunes feeling like you’re a part in Lawrence of Arabia, licking pure salt deposits, walking through “ghost towns”, and hiking through rock formations, you’ll surely begin questioning what planet you’re on, exactly.

If you’ve ever wondered the significance of the human race in the universe, you’d need not go anywhere but here to realize that, well, it’s not much. 

I also studied surfers.  I studied a lot.  California

I also studied surfers.  I studied a lot.  California

I also studied surfers.  I studied a lot.  California

I also studied surfers.  I studied a lot.  California

I also studied surfers.  I studied a lot.  California

I also studied surfers.  I studied a lot.  California

I also studied surfers.  I studied a lot.  California

I also studied surfers.  I studied a lot.  California

I also studied surfers.  I studied a lot.  California

I also studied surfers.  I studied a lot.  California

I also studied surfers.  I studied a lot.  California